Posts categorized "Resources" Feed

Lucy's Resources for the MLTI Summer Institute

Looking forward to inspiring Maine educators today! Find all my files here!

Feel free to download the Keynote file or PDFs and explore the plethora of links. Slides and accompanying notes include many resources.

If you are interested in my YouTube workshop, please join our Edmodo group to access the resource

Let's connect on Twitter. My Twitter handle is @elemenous.

 

 


Resources for Summer Spark! #usmspark

I'll be at the University School of Milwaukee's Summer Spark conference tomorrow! I'll be leading three sessions on how to get involved with the Global Education Conference, globally infused PBL and leveraging YouTube for instructional purposes. 

I've uploaded my Keynote files and PDFs of these presentations to Box.net and you can download them below or by clicking this link.  Also, my Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube can be found here. 

For my global sessions, also check out my Evernote notebook of global resources, my apps list on Appolearning, and materials from a previous workshop. We will also be using this padlet to list projects and resources. Anyone is welcome to contribute to this. 

Please let me know if you have any questions! 

  


What's New at Lucy Gray Consulting

In May and June 2015, I'll be at the following events. Hope you'll join me at one or more of these!

Registration for Global Education Day at ISTE is filling up; we're at 50% capacity. Sign up soon for this free event if you'd like to attend. This is our fourth year of hosting this event, and many attendees have remarked that it's one of their favorite events at the ISTE conference! 

Global Education Day is going to be our kickoff event for all activities related to the 2015 Global Education Conference. We're planning on announcing some additional events and changes at ISTE to our annual online conference, so stay tuned! 

For more summer professional learning opportunities, check out the events I've curated and bookmarked in this Evernote notebook. 

I've been also writing for the Ed Tech section of About.com along with Ken Royal. Here are our articles for April:

In March, I took on a new project which was fun and enlightening.  I virtually assisted with social media efforts for the 2015 Annual CUE Conference. Using a variety of tools, I kept tabs on CUE's social media streams, responding to queries from attendees and pointing to various resources. I also ran a badging pilot for this event, working closely with BadgeList and CUE Inc. to develop a learning group. (Note that BadgeList is also teaming up with the Global Education Conference to expand on badge offerings for the 2015-2016 conference year.) As many readers know, I enjoy social media and I think I've found a new aspect to my work, working with organizations to boost their social media productivity and presence. Thanks to Mike Lawrence at CUE Inc. for suggesting this role at his conference this year!

Also, in March, I spent about a week visiting 15 Chicago Public Schools to interview teachers for the CPS Ones to Watch award which is presented at the district's annual Tech Talk Conference. I've done this off and on for the past few years, and it's wonderful to see how this program has grown. There are many more tech-savvy teachers and administrators in CPS than when I initially did work with them, and much of this is fueled by the adoption of Google Apps and the CPS Computer Science for All program. 

Finally, I'm wrapping up two long-term coaching projects this June. Along with design thinking expert Don Buckley, I've been working with a great international school in New York City this year to help them develop a road map for innovation. We conducted a comprehensive assessment for this school, wrote an extensive report detailing next steps and providing resources, held design thinking workshops with faculty and provided customized professional development. We see design thinking as an incredibly versatile tool for problem-solving within schools from strategic planning to re-thinking school policies to encouraging critical thinking with students. Our hope is that this school will continue to apply this strategy moving forward as they continue to cultivate a culture of innovation. 

The other project has been a Kajeet mobile learning pilot with Chicago Public Schools; information about this project is available here. I've been coaching teachers at Falconer School for the past two years as part of this. With both projects, it's been wonderful to see growth in the ways innovation takes shape at each school. 

I've found in the past few years that I deeply enjoy innovation coaching as described in the projects above. I've had several long-term projects where I've worked with schools, and I appreciate this process as it allows me to build productive relationships with administrators and faculty.  If you know of any school or district that is looking for this type of solution, I would appreciate the referral!

Up next... a rebranding of GlobalEdCon and my professional website. Stay tuned for my next update! 


My Evernote Notebooks with Links to IB Materials and Edtech Resources

I've been collecting materials for an International Baccalaureate school that I've been working with for the past year. Below you'll find links to IB resources as well as subject-specific and ed tech  sites that may be of interest to educators. Some notebooks have more materials than others; I'll be adding to these collections during the next couple of months. If you have suggestions of other blogs, articles, and web sites that I should add,  let me know!

Also, here is a list of IB people and schools on Twitter and my IB tagged links in Diigo!


Lucy Gray's Workshop Materials for #TCEA15

Tomorrow, I'll be leading two 3 hour workshops with teachers at the TCEA conference in Austin, TX. I've re-tooled two sites to house my materials that you are welcome to browse. 

Going Global Workshops

Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube Workshops

 


Two Quick Announcements

Two fun things to share today (and a third is coming sometime this week...)!

First, I'm the new ed tech expert at About.com which means I'm writing periodically for a sub-section of their Education section. I'll be contributing news, reviews, and advice around the best stuff in ed tech as well as profiling ed tech leaders you should know. Very excited to finally get this launched!

Secondly, Julene Reed, Michelle Bougeosis and I have a proposal submitted to the panel picker for the South by Southwest Education conference (SxSWedu). Sessions are chosen in a crowd sourced manner; we need friends and colleagues to vote on our proposal in order for the workshop to be accepted at this really interesting and innovative conference. 

Our workshop proposal focuses on leveraging iTunes U in classrooms and we'd like to introduce people to the wonders of iBooks Author and iTunes Course Manager as well. Here is where you can vote and comment on our proposal... comments can be endorsements of our work or could be suggestions for improving our proposal. Also, if you haven't previously attended this conference, put t on your list of must attend events... it's very different and full of great learning experiences that will particularly challenge the more experienced educator. 

 

 


Shame on Slideshare and Lessons Learned

MAY 13, 2014 UPDATE: My account has been restored and upgraded. Yay! Thank you, Slideshare, for making the impossible happen!

http://www.slideshare.net/elemenous

If you take a look at my blog and particularly at posts under the Conferences category, you'll notice many gaping holes to embedded content.  These holes are where my slides posted in Slideshare and embedded on my blog appeared until recently. Without warning, Slideshare didn't just suspend my account, but deleted the entire account and its contents because I've violated their Terms of Service agreement. From what I understand from their twitter evangelist, this account is now irretrievable.  I have not received any written warning about this nor has anyone from Slideshare responded to my queries about what I did exactly. 

If you're not familiar with Slideshare, it's similar to YouTube... only for slidedecks. You can upload PowerPoint files and PDFs, and Slideshare provides an embed code that you can use to show your slides front facing style in a blog, wiki or similar web site. It's also a social network that allows users to follow other member's posts and to favorite slideshows. 

I've been using Slideshare regularly since at least 2009 under the username elemenous. I've uploaded hundreds of presentations, favorited many others for future reference, and followed others in order to learn from their design and content. I've received numerous emails from them congratulating on my content and lauding the "popularity" of my content. See some of the screenshots I am posting. 

Typically, when I present at a conference, I created slidedecks in Keynote, convert the slides to a PDF and  then upload the file to Slideshare. I then embed this in my blog and give that link to attendees. This way they can follow along with my slides or download my slides for future reference. My content is usually made up of a template that I've used from Keynote or purchased here, photos that I've taken, photos I've purchased from iStockPhoto,  original ideas, and a lot of screenshots of web sites. I use Instantshot mostly to take screenshots of sites that I am demonstrating in my presentations. Using Preview, I sometimes annotate these screenshots to point out particular features. I generally link to the site that I am demo'ing so that attendees can go directly to a site and explore whatever I've mentioned.

One of my last presentations to be uploaded on Slideshare about using YouTube in the classroom. In order to quickly and efficiently go through a lot of material about this great educational resource, I've had to use screenshots to demonstrate my points.  I show what my YouTube channel looks like, how to add a video to a playlist, and how to search YouTube effectively through screenshots among other things. Attendees at conferences need visuals during presentations and afterwards in order to retain and use the information I provide. I could give this information to them in a paper handout, but in order to save trees, all of this is posted online. 

My work as an ed tech advocate focuses on helping teachers become more connected and tech savvy. My main intent is to help and inspire people and part of that is making materials accessible to them. This all doesn't really matter if I'm violating copyright, though. 

That said, here's what happened regarding my account:

1. I lasted posted material on slideshare probably in conjunction with a conference in the Waukegan school district or SxSWedu in February/March. These were standard presentations that I've given before and tweaked for these events. Earlier versions of these presentations were on Slideshare.

2. I did not touch my Slideshare account for about a month. As I was listening to Jackie Gerstein last week during the online Learning Revolution conference, I went to Slideshare to favorite her fabulous slidedeck. Not going to link to it here in case Slideshare wants to delete HER account. I noticed that I had trouble logging in... normally, I'm automatically signed in there. I tried logging in with LinkedIn and Facebook and my stuff wasn't coming up. I didn't have time to figure out what was going on and assumed that I just hadn't linked Slideshare to my FB or LinkedIn accounts.

3. I returned to Slideshare a few days ago to see what was wrong with my account, and realized that when I had tried to log in (see step 2), I had created new accounts. I looked all over and tried logging in with my known user name and password, and realized that I couldn't. My account was completely gone. I looked at my blog and at my LinkedIn profile that had presentations linked there. None of the content was appearing.

4. I submitted a help ticket asking for help and noticed that I had submitted a help ticket for a similar problem 7 months ago. While uploading presentations, I was inexplicably locked out as opposed to my account just being deleted.  I was not given a TOS warning. Upon investigation, Slideshare reinstated my account, so I thought it was a glitch.

5. I then tried to reach out to Slideshare via Twitter. No one from @Slideshare responded. A follower, however, did provide me with the email address of an editor at Slideshare and I held off from contacting her at first.

6. I wait and wait and nearly 48 hours later, I checked the status of my help ticket. My ticket was completely deleted ... there was a message in the help center saying that it was either deleted or resolved.  So no record exists of my two contacts with customer service. I have some screenshots, though. I submitted another ticket using a newly created account. 

7. During this time, I also searched the internet for other users who were reporting problems. I found this post and this post. In the former blog entry, I found the name of a Slideshare evangelist, Guarav Shukla, who did respond to a tweet and said he'd look into it. Later, he said my account was deleted due to TOS and it was not possible to retreive it.  Note that I had not received any notifications from Slideshare nor a response to my first or second help ticket.

8. Meanwhile, I happened to look at my LinkedIn account, and if you don't know this, there is a section where you can see who's looked at your profile. Lo and behold, someone from Slideshare named Christopher Schaff had been checking me out. He's a customer service rep for Slideshare! I decided to connect with him on LinkedIn...and of course, he hasn't responded to that request. :) 

9. I then decide it is time to contact the editor from Slideshare to see if she can help. She responds fairly quickly and says she'll forward my issues on to customer service. Lo and behold, she's also checked out my LinkedIn profile. Note to the less social media savvy: Turn off the ability for people to see that you've looked at their profiles in your LinkedIn privacy settings. 

10. This morning, I heard from the Twitter contact about my TOS violation. No official word followed, other than a LinkedIn communication from Christopher saying that they would refund my account. I'm not sure if I paid for a pro account this year or not...actually.

11. I've since tweeted Guarav asking for further explanation and submitted more comments on my second help ticket asking for clarification. I've also looked through their community guidelines and I can't figure out what I did wrong other than use screenshots of web sites. If they had warned me, I would have taken things down and altered the way I did future presentations. It also states here that if your account has been banned, you are forbidden from creating accounts in the future. How was able to create 2 new accounts inadvertently then when I was trying to log in through FB and LinkedIn at the begining of this saga? 

How ridiculous is the following given this situation? Again from their community guidelines: 

"We trust you to be responsible and respect each other. SlideShare is a large community of people. In order for all of us to live happily on this service together, it implies a certain level of trust. Trust and respect each other!"

"SlideShare does not actively screen content being uploaded because we trust you to self-moderate. But we do have a system where users flag accounts or slideshows for violations/abuse and we will step in when we think it's necessary."

I wish Slideshare would respect me enough to give me an explanation for what happened here so that I can learn from any mistakes I made. 

And from their Help Center:

"We suspend and disable SlideShare accounts that violate our ToS. This includes:

  • Continued prohibited behavior after receiving a warning or multiple warnings from SlideShare
  • Unsolicited contact with others for the purpose of harassment, advertisement, selling, dating, or any other inappropriate conduct
  • Providing false credentials for the purpose of creating an account
  • Impersonation of any individual, entity, or other misrepresentation of identity
  • Posting content that violates our terms

Please review SlideShare's community guidelines to learn more about our policies. If you think your account was disabled by mistake, you can send us a ticket by clicking on the link below. We will gladly review your account and fix it if we made a mistake. "

 So to wrap this up and put this situation to bed.... here is how it stands for me.

  • See related screenshots documenting my experience here. I would be happy to take these down if I received a decent response from Slideshare. 
  • I wish Slideshare had better customer service and had the courtesy to explain any wrong doings to me.
  • If I did anything in violation of anything, I'd be happy to correct it. I would have appreciated the chance to learn from this. 
  • I am cancelling my LinkedIn premium subscription as they apparently own Slideshare. I wish I could live without LinkedIn altogether, but it's requiste in today's work environment.
  • This is not about backing up for me. I have copies of my presenations. I am not pleased that there now gaps in my blog posts and that teachers can no longer benefit from my work. 
  • This is a warning about the future of content and how a company can eliminate your stuff without any due process. I really have no power to rectify this situation, other than to write about it and post to my social media channels. Fortunately, I do have some reach, so hopefully this will influence other educators on how they should protect their materials and help them decide about which companies that they want to do business with.

 

 

 

 


Compiling High Quality Resources Related to SPED and Accessibility

I'm currently working on a project involving  a school that specializes in working with kids who have dyslexia. My goal is to provide them with a list of high quality resources related to special education and ed tech. This list is not intended to be comprehensive as I think that might be a bit overwhelming for a school that is just attempting to realize the full potential of ed tech in their classrooms.

Right now, I'm particularly interested in the following:

  • Accessibility features and tips/tricks for Macs, iPads and Chromebooks 
  • Case studies or articles that tell stories of how ed tech benefits special needs students, particularly those with dyslexia
  • Names and Twitter IDs of thought leaders and practitioners in related fields to special education (would be great to find a couple of Twitter lists [see an example] as these lists make it easy to follow a bunch of people at once)
  • Names of organizations that provide resources and information around special education

Here is the link to the multi-tabbed Google Spreadsheet that I've started; it is completely open and editable by anyone, so feel free to add anything that you think is outstanding. Look at the bottom of the spreadsheet to see the different categories by tab. 

If you want to leave your name and/or Twitter handle for others to follow you, feel free to do so on the contributors tab.  You are also welcome to refer to this list and copy it to your own Drive if you'd like to use this for future reference. 


Social Media and Mobile Learning Workshop at #CoSN14

New Leadership for Mobile Learning Project Director Marie Bjerede and I will be hosting a workshop next at week at the Consortium for School Networking's annual conference. The focus will be on using social media in conjunction with mobile devices and the purpose will be to give school leaders more direct instruction with using social media effectively. It seems that many administrators don't have the time and/or inclination to dive into the world of Web 2.0 tools, and we want to provide an opportunity for such types to play with tools that will potentially enhance their work. 

That said, we are not going to cover every single hot social media channel out there during this three hour workshop. Instead, we'll explore social networks and blogs and then dive into microblogging and social bookmarking. We could go to town by looking at YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram, etc., but we will keep things simple and practical for the scope of the workshop. 

All of these tools are almost rendered useless, however, unless one takes time to develop a personal learning network. This means you connect to others who share your professional interests and this increases your chances of learning about best practices, identifying great resources, and building opportunities for collaboration. During this workshop, we'll give advice on how to do this as well as how to develop one's online professional persona. 

Anyone is welcome to peruse our workshop materials (see below) and contribute to our networking survey. We'd love to have school leaders show how they are leveraging social media and connect with workshop participants. Please also follow our conversations on Twitter by searching for the hashtags #CoSN14 and #CoSNLML.  

 


Quick #ICE14 Debrief

www.flickr.com
items in ICE Conference - Illinois Computing Educators More in ICE Conference - Illinois Computing Educators pool

Random thoughts about the 2014 Illinois Computing Educators Conference (before they seep from my brain)....

1. George Couros and Mike Muir were the perfect one-two punch as keynotes. Witty, inspirational, humorous presentations by both! Catch recordings of keynote and other sessions here: http://www.youtube.com/user/iceil/videos

2. Very grateful to spend time with Mike, tapping his brain about all things ed tech and Maine. Once again, I'm reminded that Maine's experiences with 1 to 1 should really be examined by all school districts in this day and age. I'm really looking forward to diving into Mike's materials on various sites as I contemplate some of the projects I'm working on.
http://inventivereasoning.com/
http://distributedpd.wordpress.com/
http://multiplepathways.wordpress.com/
http://www.mcmel.org/

3. All of our featured speakers were fabulous... thank you, Rich Colosi, Carolyn Skibba, Jason Markey, Teri Olson Rossman, Greg Tang, Tammy Worcester Tang, and Luis Perez. Also, huge thanks to BYOC speakers including Steve Dembo... always a hit with attendees.

4. I think it was very interesting to have someone featured at ICE that was a content expert first and foremost (Greg Tang). We should try and get similar people next year. Can't wait to try out his app and games with my fifth grader. http://gregtangmath.com/

5. Tammy Lind's spirit was particularly infectious. She gets the term I coin professional generosity. She did a lovely job of keeping things simple and clear, yet informative, for her audiences. Loved how as I trudged to my car after the closing ceremonies, she was sitting in the hotel lounge with a circle of attendees around her, still sharing ideas. Everyone else was long gone and they were all still drinking it up.
http://goo.gl/FkDzTu

6. Jason Markey also impressed me with his youthful energy. I think he sleeps less than I do and is remarkably perky. No wonder he's a principal! Also, loved seeing his kids in action during one of his sessions.

7. Happy to see former colleagues and my current coaching friends from Falconer and D230 get excited about various things at the conference. Next year, all of these people should take the plunge and present at ICE! It's time!

8. Also in the friend department, I'm grateful for another ADE get together at ICE. Just love my original PLC people.

9. Next year, we need to have a Fitbit contest and find out logs the most miles. I think I made my goal every day walking all over Pheasant Run. My trainer will be happy.

10. The newly configured exhibit hall was such a hit! The PLN Plaza was the hub of activity and the presentation stage featured a variety of presentations. Kudos to Jennifer Misong Magiera and assorted others who made much of that happen.

11. The Wednesday evening reception in the exhibit hall plus the morning breakfasts held in the same area really drew people. The exhibit hall seemed to come alive this year.

12. Wish I had had more time to partake in EdCamp After Dark. I think it was a huge success, judging from the turnout and notes. Loved how this was free and open to anyone who was around Wednesday night.

13. A HUGE thank you goes out to my fellow ICE conference committee members. It was a joy seeing everyone spring into action with their various conference duties. I'm continually inspired by the quality of my committee colleagues' work and have particularly enjoyed working with all of you this year.

Executive Director Margaret Johnson is the ICE-ing (pun intended) on the cake... I think her leadership makes us all want to go above and beyond the call to make the ICE conference a great experience for attendees.

14. Thank you again to the ICE people involved with my selection this year for the Making IT Happen award. I was pleasantly stunned when Charlene Chausis informed me of this award in January and I think this is the first time I've been honored by colleagues for my work in advocating for educational technology. There is nothing like being pointed out for doing good when you are least expecting it and I deeply appreciate the recognition. I stand on the shoulders of giants who've come before me throughout my involvement with ICE... more on this later.

15. Finally, we have a great thing going here in Illinois. So many talented, innovative educators and more catching fire with every conference. Can't wait to see how ICE can push the envelope further in terms of empowering teachers in the years to come!

Hope everyone got home safe and sound! See you next year!


Mobile Learning Resources

As it's the beginning of a new school year, I just wanted to re-share with you resources from the Leadership for Mobile Learning at CoSN. I'm the project director for this initiative and am constantly curating information related to this topic.

Please check out:

Our LinkedIn CoSN subgroup on Mobile Learning: http://goo.gl/s62TD
Don't forget to also join CoSN's main LinkedIn group: http://goo.gl/d7r73

Our daily digital newsaper on Paper.li with mobile learning news: http://paper.li/elemenous/1339386897
Our social bookmarking group in Diigo: https://groups.diigo.com/group/leadership-for-mobile-learning-initiative (TIP: search our group by state abbreviation to see ML news in your area or search by device name to see news and resources)
And finally, our Guide to Mobile Learning which will help schools think ahead:
https://sites.google.com/site/lmlguide/ .

Let me know if you have any questions or can suggest other resources. I'm particularly looking for stuff related to non-iOS mobile learning so that I can present a wide range of resources to CoSN membership and beyond! 


#METC13 Presentations

 

Please download my slides and/or PDF copies of slides from Box.net or view them on Slideshare. Let me know if you have any questions or comments!

 



 

Download ModernizingEducation_METC

Download METC_Search

Download METC_Multimedia_2013

Download METC_Global

 



Wes Fryer: A One Man Blogging Machine at #blackfootetc

Untitled

Earlier this week, I had the opportunity to keynote Blackfoot Telecommunications Group's Educational Technology Conference in Missoula, Montana, a place that I previously have not had the opportunity to visit.  I received this invitation,  thanks to Wesley Fryer who has been involved with this conference for the past couple of years.  

Montanan educators were attentive and interested in educational technology, and seemed dedicated and thoughtful about their craft. Most surprisingly to me, many of these teachers work in tiny schools, often with 15-20 student maximum, and are responsbile for teaching everything to their students. As a result, it seems that it's more difficult for students to slip through the cracks and I'm guessing that teachers have to be pretty accountable for making things work in these situations, too. I loved hearing about these teaching scenarios as my perspective was broadened in terms of what students and teachers across America, even in rural areas, are experiencing. It also made me think more about the idea of making "highly qualified" teachers available to all students. Here in the suburbs of Chicago, we take it for granted that our kids will have a Mandarin teacher or a Calculus teacher, but what happens in remote areas of our country where it might not be possible to recruit great teachers in these subject areas? Students in states with widely dispersed populations are going to definitely benefit from increased online opportunities, and this is another reason not to ingore the trend of virtual instruction.

Speaking of online instruction, Wesley introduced me to Jason Neiffer, curriculum director of the Montana Digital Academy, and Mike Agostinelli of Helena Public Schools. This duo gave a few compelling presentations (see Wesley's links below) and had dinner with us one night. Our conversations gave me further insight into Montana, and we started brainstorming ideas for a ed tech wilderness experience/retreat for similarly minded school leaders. Stay tuned to see if we go anywhere with this idea!

Mostly importantly, besides being my first visit to Montana, it also was my first experience working closely with Wes, and I'm happy to report that the entire experience really fun and enriching. If you've never gotten the Wes Fryer treatment during a conference, you are particularly missing out. He is one of the few people I know who still has the time and inclination to take detailed notes during events. The best part is that he posts these online almost immediately, and includes relevant links and recordings. As someone who gets nervous about being scrutnized professionally, I found Wes's blogging to be enormously helpful as he does this in the least judgemental way, and his posts help me determined if I covered salient points. Below are some of what he covered at the Blackfoot ETC and I think this is a tremendously valuable service. Additionally, Wesley also did one of the best keynotes I've seen him do over the past few years... he has really evolved and improved as a keynote speaker. So, this is an unsolicited plug for Wes in terms of the education conference circuit... I think he'd be invaluable for his speaking skills and for participating in the conference experience along with attendees. 

Check out some of the highlights of the Blackfoot Educational Technology Conference, courtsey of Wesley Fryer:

Wes's Professional Wiki

Educational Podcasts from Blackfoot ETC

Using Social Media to Improve Classroom and School Communications

Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube (my session)

Mobile E-Book Options

Digital Textbooks Using iBooks

30 in 60: 30 Tools for Tech Savvy Teachers

Getting Your Game On

Beyond Search ( my session)

Mobilizing Learning

My Flickr Photos of the Blackfoot ETC


New Google Custom Search Engines and Handouts

For the upcoming Chicago Tech Forum, this week I developed a handout and a Google Custom Search engine devoted to finding iOS resources. I culled my collections of links related to iPods, iPhones, and iPads to identify the best resources and moving forward, I plan to keep adding to this. The search engine is designed to search most of the web sites listed in the handout, and I'll be adding to this as well. If you're looking for a particular topic related to using these devices in schools, this engine might help you refine your search and higher quality results.

Additionally, I updated my High Techpectations Google Custom Search Engine and created a handout of education starting points. It only searches web sites that I consider to be of high quality.

With both of these search engines feel free either link to their start pages, add them to your iGoogle pages, or embed their codes in your own web sites.


ITSC - Beyond Search

Download ITSCsearch

My many, many slides for my Beyond Search presentation tomorrow. I swear this is a hand-on session! Download the presentation from Slideshare or the PDF from Scribd and follow along. Links in these documents should be live.

We also will be creating a search scavenger hunt on this Google Doc. Feel free to add your own items for this.

 

 

Beyond Search - ITSC Conference
View more presentations from Lucy Gray.

ITSC Beyond Search


Friday 5: Interactive Sites

Using multimedia in the classroom is one of the suggestions put forth by math teacher Dan Meyer in his TEDxNYED talk from last spring.  I watched the video of his presentation today in preparation for my own talk at this year's TEDxNYED and it's well worth a look by any teacher, not just teachers of math.

If you have other suggestions for interactive web sites, leave them in the comments! Thanks!

1. Interactive Learning Opportunities on the Internet
http://www.techteachconcepts.com/interactive_learning.htm

2. Library of Congress Interactives
http://myloc.gov/Exhibitions/Pages/default.aspx

3. Spin and Spell
http://www.spinandspell.com/

4. Interactivate
http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/

5. PhET Interactive Simulations
http://phet.colorado.edu/