Posts categorized "Global Education" Feed

Lucy Gray Presentation Resources for #GEF16

Please consider joining our Global Education Conference Network located at http://globaleducationconference.com and follow us on Twitter at @GlobalEdCon. Proposals for our upcoming online conference are due November 1, 2016. And don't forget about this grant opportunity: http://www.globalcollaborationday.org/the-great-global-project-challenge-grant.html. 

I've added my Keynote slides and PDFs of my presentations for the Global Education Forum to a folder in Google Drive: http://bit.ly/LucyGrayGEF. Feel free to download any of these resources. 

 


#CUEROCKSTAR Global PBL Resources

Hi All -

Anyone, including those not present in my workshops today, are welcome to join my Edmodo group, Project-Based Learning with a Global Focus. Use this link to join and I'll approve your membership: https://www.edmodo.com/home#/join/qtizux.

Make sure to check out the four tabs of global learning resources that I've compiled in this Google sheet. Feel free to add any additional resources that you think are valuable. This is not an exhaustive list; I'll be adding to this frequently.

Thanks,

Lucy 


Lucy's Resources for the MLTI Summer Institute

Looking forward to inspiring Maine educators today! Find all my files here!

Feel free to download the Keynote file or PDFs and explore the plethora of links. Slides and accompanying notes include many resources.

If you are interested in my YouTube workshop, please join our Edmodo group to access the resource

Let's connect on Twitter. My Twitter handle is @elemenous.

 

 


Technology for Teaching and Learning Conference #KCDTTL

Welcome, #KCDTTL attendees! Here are resources cited in my talks at Kentucky Country Day's Technology for Teaching and Learning Conference. Please free free to download and browse any of these resources.

  1. Introductions Padlet
  2. Connecting to the World handout on Tackk
  3. Share Global Resources Padlet
  4. Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube on Tackk
  5. Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube Slides and below
  6. Slide decks for both global sessions can be downloaded in PDF or Keynote formats from Box.net.

 


Resources for Summer Spark! #usmspark

I'll be at the University School of Milwaukee's Summer Spark conference tomorrow! I'll be leading three sessions on how to get involved with the Global Education Conference, globally infused PBL and leveraging YouTube for instructional purposes. 

I've uploaded my Keynote files and PDFs of these presentations to Box.net and you can download them below or by clicking this link.  Also, my Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube can be found here. 

For my global sessions, also check out my Evernote notebook of global resources, my apps list on Appolearning, and materials from a previous workshop. We will also be using this padlet to list projects and resources. Anyone is welcome to contribute to this. 

Please let me know if you have any questions! 

  


What's New at Lucy Gray Consulting

In May and June 2015, I'll be at the following events. Hope you'll join me at one or more of these!

Registration for Global Education Day at ISTE is filling up; we're at 50% capacity. Sign up soon for this free event if you'd like to attend. This is our fourth year of hosting this event, and many attendees have remarked that it's one of their favorite events at the ISTE conference! 

Global Education Day is going to be our kickoff event for all activities related to the 2015 Global Education Conference. We're planning on announcing some additional events and changes at ISTE to our annual online conference, so stay tuned! 

For more summer professional learning opportunities, check out the events I've curated and bookmarked in this Evernote notebook. 

I've been also writing for the Ed Tech section of About.com along with Ken Royal. Here are our articles for April:

In March, I took on a new project which was fun and enlightening.  I virtually assisted with social media efforts for the 2015 Annual CUE Conference. Using a variety of tools, I kept tabs on CUE's social media streams, responding to queries from attendees and pointing to various resources. I also ran a badging pilot for this event, working closely with BadgeList and CUE Inc. to develop a learning group. (Note that BadgeList is also teaming up with the Global Education Conference to expand on badge offerings for the 2015-2016 conference year.) As many readers know, I enjoy social media and I think I've found a new aspect to my work, working with organizations to boost their social media productivity and presence. Thanks to Mike Lawrence at CUE Inc. for suggesting this role at his conference this year!

Also, in March, I spent about a week visiting 15 Chicago Public Schools to interview teachers for the CPS Ones to Watch award which is presented at the district's annual Tech Talk Conference. I've done this off and on for the past few years, and it's wonderful to see how this program has grown. There are many more tech-savvy teachers and administrators in CPS than when I initially did work with them, and much of this is fueled by the adoption of Google Apps and the CPS Computer Science for All program. 

Finally, I'm wrapping up two long-term coaching projects this June. Along with design thinking expert Don Buckley, I've been working with a great international school in New York City this year to help them develop a road map for innovation. We conducted a comprehensive assessment for this school, wrote an extensive report detailing next steps and providing resources, held design thinking workshops with faculty and provided customized professional development. We see design thinking as an incredibly versatile tool for problem-solving within schools from strategic planning to re-thinking school policies to encouraging critical thinking with students. Our hope is that this school will continue to apply this strategy moving forward as they continue to cultivate a culture of innovation. 

The other project has been a Kajeet mobile learning pilot with Chicago Public Schools; information about this project is available here. I've been coaching teachers at Falconer School for the past two years as part of this. With both projects, it's been wonderful to see growth in the ways innovation takes shape at each school. 

I've found in the past few years that I deeply enjoy innovation coaching as described in the projects above. I've had several long-term projects where I've worked with schools, and I appreciate this process as it allows me to build productive relationships with administrators and faculty.  If you know of any school or district that is looking for this type of solution, I would appreciate the referral!

Up next... a rebranding of GlobalEdCon and my professional website. Stay tuned for my next update! 


Lucy Gray's Workshop Materials for #TCEA15

Tomorrow, I'll be leading two 3 hour workshops with teachers at the TCEA conference in Austin, TX. I've re-tooled two sites to house my materials that you are welcome to browse. 

Going Global Workshops

Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube Workshops

 


Presentation Materials for #ISACScon

I'm thrilled and honored to speaking at the annual ISACS conference today! Please feel free to download my materials so that you don't have to take copious notes. In my YouTube and global presenations, there are many hyperlinks to resources that are clickable, including some photos. I've included my slides in Apple's Keynote format as well as PDFs. I've also added my slides to Slideshare. If you are working on an iPad, the Keynote and PDF options will probably work best for you.

If you need to follow up with me, please contact me at lucy@lucygrayconsulting, @elemenous on Twitter, or @GlobalEdCon on Twitter.

Our backchannel for questions, resource sharing, and conversation can be found at:

https://todaysmeet.com/lucygrayisacs.

 

 


World View Presentation Materials #WVGlobalEdCon

Our slides and more from the 2014 World View conference at University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill!  

 

 

Download slides in PDF or Keynote formats:

 

 

World View Backchannel

The Learning Revolution Project  - Steve   steve@hargadon.com    @stevehargadon 

Lucy Gray Consulting - Lucy   lucy@lucygrayconsulting.com    @elemenous 

The Global Education Conference

The 2014 Conference hashtag is #globaled14. Tagboard is a great way to keep track of all the posts using this hashtag: https://tagboard.com/globaled14/194756. Also,  check out http://twubs.com/globaled14!

 Find GlobalEdCon On: 

Global Ed Resources

Additional Online Communities

 

 


Resources from Chicago Education Festival #edfestchi

Here's the narrated version of my slides. 

 

And here are my slides devoid of my scripted presentation.... the opening image won't appear. I uploaded another copy and perhaps it will start working properly. 

 

 

Download the PDF and Keynote files here:


Education Fast Forward #9

Make sure to tune into the ninth debate of Education Fast Forward on January 20. This  event is scheduled take in front of an audience of education ministers from around the world who are also attending the World Education Forum in London. It will also be broadcast  over the Internet, and recorded for those who aren't operating in the same time zone. Sponsors of this include Promethean and Cisco Systems. 

I've been invited as a special guest to my third EFF debate which means I'll be connecting to the meeting from New York via Telepresence, Cisco's impressive videoconference system. Two presenters and a moderator will start the debate and then invited guests, such as myself, will potentially contributing to the ensuing discussion. It truly is a global conversation as special guests and EFF fellows will be joining in from far flung corners of the world. 

You can see previous debates in the playlist below; I particularly recommend EFF #8 as Michael Fullan was one of the featured guests and he is always incredibly insightful into educational change. 

The featured speakers for EFF #9 are Senator David Coltart of Zimbabwe,  Vicky Colbert, founder of Colombia’s Escuela Nueva, and Ramji Raghavan, founder of India’s Agastya International Foundation. Ramji was one of our keynotes at last year's STEMxCon and I think you'll be inspired by all the featured speakers' work. 

 


GlobalEdCon Follow Up

Hope you enjoyed last week's conference!  Again, many thanks to our sponsors, keynotes, presenters, and mighty volunteers!

As we mentioned during the closing session on Friday, we are planning future events including a Global Education Summit in North Carolina this spring, followed by a Global Education Day just prior to the International Society for Technology in Education Conference (ISTE) in Atlanta, Georgia this June. If you are interested in sponsoring or helping to plan these events, contact Steve at steve@hargadon.com. 

Also, here are a few important reminders and resources for you to reference and pass along to friends and colleagues!

Reminders

  • All recordings, including our closing session,  are located here: http://www.globaleducationconference.com/page/2013-conference-recordings
  • Anyone can download the MP3 and MP4 files from the presentations and re-purpose them along as attribution is given to the presenter and it is for non-commercial purposes. See our Creative Commons license for details. 
  • Conference keynote presenations will be posted to YouTube as well: https://www.youtube.com/user/globaledcon (Not all are up yet... stay tuned!)
  • Read here for information about requesting certificates.
    • Attendee certificates will also be given to those who watch the recordings post-conference.
    • Attendees must write a full paragraph (minimum) blog post describing what they learned from sessions attended in order to receive a certificate. 
    • Blog posts that just thank us for the conference or do not contain sufficient reflection will not count and will not be accepted. 
    • If requests do not meet our established criteria, you will not receive a certificate. It is the requester's responsiblity to read and follow directions and we cannot notify people if they have not followed the necessary steps.
    • Volunteer certificates are for those who moderated sessions, attended educator advisory board meetings, or who worked on projects comissioned by the conference co-chairs. 
    • All requests must be submitted by December 6, 2013 at 5 PM CST (GMT-6). Certificates will be sent or posted online on December 8, 2013.
  • Please consider signing the Charter for Compassion; information about becoming a Compassionate School and more educational resources are also available here. This Charter was discussed by Friday's keynote, Marilyn Turkovich

Resources

Carry on the spirit of the conference by contiuing to leverage the resources developed by our community. Here are a few quick links:

  • Read our crowdsourced A Declaration of the Value of Global Education
  • Recordings
  • Groups - We have many affinity groups for those interested in connecting with community members. There are groups for language teachers, primary teachers, higher education, Skype using teachers, etc. Feel free to create your own group on a topic of interest.
  • Ongoing Projects - Five group projects were established during the conference. Consider participating:
  • Discussion Forum - If you want to post a call for participation, solicity project partners, share a resource, or ask a question, please post in our discussions. This is a great place to connect with other GEC members. 
  • Social Media - We have several social media channels. Here are a few to check out.
    • Diigo (social bookmarking): https://groups.diigo.com/group/globaleducation
    • Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/globaledcon/
    • Paper.li (a daily digital newspaper): http://paper.li/elemenous/global-education
    • YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/globaledcon
    • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/globaledcon
    • Twitter: https://twitter.com/GlobalEdCon

Thanks again for your support,

Lucy Gray and Steve Haragdon

Conference Co-Chairs 


GlobalEdCon Gratitude #globaled13

Steve Hargadon and I just wrapped up our fourth annaul Global Education Conference... a online  professional development marathon that we've designed in order to connect and empower educators and organizations around the globe. 

Presenters submit proposals, are encouraged to promote their sessions upon acceptance, book their sessions using a wonderful tool called YouCanBookMe,  and deliver their information via webinar format. We have made this process as open as possible as we want to see people from all walks have the opportunity to share their work. If proposals relate to the mission of our conference, it will be accepted. As a result, you'll see students, higher ed, K12 and informal learning folks all come together in this event. How often do you see this with face to face events? We are deeply appreciative of all of our presenters who are risk takers and believe in sharing with our community.

Participating also requires a bit of work and perseverance. Attendees need to configure their computers, analysis the conference schedule in Google Calendar, and access sesssions through our platform Blackboard Collaborate. For many, this is also an introduction to social media usage and we have many high flying regular attendees who are using social media in very sophisticated ways. There is a lot of information parlayed about, and our conference is an exercise filtering this effectively. Again, this is a very new concept to many people. 

This entire process is not for the faint of heart, but it does work and we believe that it leaves people feeling empowered, energized, and as if they had direct acccess to experts. While we are always looking to simply and support our attendees and presenters, we want to see everyone develop confidence and take responsibility for their own learning. It's exciting to see this happen during the course of conference week, and I also believe that we are giving access and opportunities to high quality information to those who cannot travel to participate or present in conferences. This event is very exciting to me because participants have many choices and can choose their own professional development adventure; no authority figure or body is deeming teachers to be deficient by setting the agenda. Teachers can pursue their interests and passions in our virtual rooms. 

Regarding our keynotes, Steve thinks that I have a special gift with putting together great lineups of featured speakers, but this is not really the case. I just pay attention to people who I think have  particularly profound and unique messages for inspiring our attendees, and hope that they will take this opportunity to interact with our audience. I also want to bring light to programs/initiatives/people that I think are outstanding, but may not be in the mainstream yet. While we can't pay our keynotes (we receive very little funds in terms of sponsorship because we just haven't made fundraising a huge priority), I hope that we return the favor to our keynotes by promoting their work on an ongoing basis and thinking of them when we make referrals to other people and groups. I think that developing a relationship with Steve and I can be beneficial in the future. Our keynotes represent the term I've coined "professional generosity"... they understand that the giving back to the education community and that grass roots word of mouth can lead to powerful returns and synergy.

Another vital component to this events is our volunteer group. We have a leadership team of core advisors with whom we consult with regularly and generally people we've known for a significant period of time in addition to a larger advisory board which anyone is welcome to join. Out of these groups has emerged a set of volunteers who moderate sessions and help participants in our chat room and our virtual conference lounge. It's astounding how these people step up to the plat and how we all bond during this experience. I still think of my friend Larry Anderson who joined us for a few years... the first time, he had no idea how to use Blackboard Collaborate, but reviewed our training video and immediate jumped in because he was so moved by our sessions. And this year, I'm particularly grateful for a volunteer from Uganda named Ibrahim. Always perky with a great sense of humor, he became one of us this week. He thinks he found us by one of the Facebook ads that I ran recently, too! By the way, we've had much more participation in the conference in general from the Middle East and Africa... I am so glad that we are expanding our reach.

I cannot go further with my analysis of the conference without also thanking our main sponsors, iEARN and the Global Campaign for Education. iEARN has been the mainstay global education organization in this space, and we've learned so much from them. We are happy to have so many iEARNers sharing their work every year, and have really enjoyed getting to know Diane Midness, David Potter (who is an incredible user of social media btw) , Lisa Jobson and Ed Gragert (iEARN's director emeritus). Ed is the most networked global ed expert I know and now has brought his expertise to the Global Campaign for Education - US Chapter. We are blessed and lucky to have these organizations as partners. Combined with our volunteers, I feel like we have just an amazing group of professional friends. 

Finally, I want to tip my hat to Steve Hargadon, who exhibits infinite patience with me and the rest of this group. He is a man of incredible character and wisdom, and again, I am lucky to know him and work well with him. Looking forward to many more adventures with global education!

I believe that each of us holds the potential to become as great as the sum of our friends and colleagues, and without my incredible professional network, I would be nothing. Thank you, everyone involved with GlobalEdCon.... you inspire and inform me continually, and I look forward to learning together going forward. You all make me love what I do! 


We're on for the Fourth Annual Global Education Conference!

Stay tuned for a plethora of information regarding our fourth free and online conference focused on global education. Remember, this is not a technology nor a general education conference. Share your ideas and initiatives around connecting classrooms and inspiring education for all!

Here's a digital flyer that you can pass along to colleagues. Proposals are due by November 15th!

 

 


My 2012 Singapore Report

I've hugged my family,  unpacked my bags, given my kids gifts (which included a Singaporean version of Monopoly),  run a few loads of laundry and am now settled in to write a bit about my trip during this past week to Singapore. Thanks to my friend, fellow Apple Distinguished Educator colleague, and now Apple employee,  Pav,  I was first invited to work with a new class of Apple Distinguished Educators for the Asia region back in 2008. That was a life changing trip in itself..... I had the opportunity to visit several Singaporean schools, including the School of the Arts and Singapore Sports School, and also to work with amazing Singaporean and international school educators for a week during the 2008 Asia Apple Distinguished Educator Institute.  A year later, educators and students from Maris Stella High School in Singapore came to Chicago over the course of two visits  to the U.S,  intent on forming  foundations for global collaborations. I was priviledged to spend time with Maris Stella teams on both visits.

Consequently, I've thought a great deal about Asia, and specifically Singapore, and was really pleased to be invited to return again this spring. On this visit, the city/country itself seemed to not have changed much, although it did seem like it was more populous. There were still many buildings under construction as evidenced by a plethora of construction cranes, established buildings and streets were in pristine condition, and the weather was still hot, and perhaps a bit more humid. Two huge Singaporean projects were finished since my last visit.... the Universal Studios theme park on Sentosa Island where I stayed last time, and the amazing Marina Bay Sands casino complex with a ship-like structure and pool on its roof. I stayed near Orchard Road, a main high-end shopping district, and again, was amazed by the mass amount of attention devoted to brands and shopping. Marina Bay Sands also sported a very high end mall which was astoundingly huge. To me, the focus on consumerism was a bit overwhelming, but also a sign of a vibrant economy. We also drove by Singapore's port which reportedly is the largest in the world and never closes. Not much is made in Singapore and it is a gateway to the rest of Asia. Human capital is its best resource and this is evident in the careful planning that pervades this society.

As an aside, I think Singapore would make an excellent topic of study in a interdisciplinary global studies program in middle or high school. Studying its very intentional government would lead to fascinating debates regarding how much control governments should or should not have. Singapore is also a go to country for many financial institutions, so studying its economic forces and impact on the world's economy would also be of interest. And, examining its highly competitive educational system would also lends itself to thinking deeply about the purpose of education.  The possibilities would be endless here....

Continuing on with details on my visit, I spent four days holding workshops for Asian educators, mostly focused on the iPad. For the first two days, there was an emphasis on accessibility and our third day focused more on general use of Apple technologies. The format of the workshops really worked well and kept participants busy and engaged. Pav served as an emcee extraordinaire and kept the mood light. He's really come into his own working for Apple, and I was so impressed with his leadership and knowledge. Working with me on various days were several ADEs including Jane Ross, Jane Harris, Dawn Hallett, Tyler Sherwood, and Rob Newberry and Greg O'Connor of Australia's Spectronics which runs this conference on inclusive learning technologies. This team was absolutely delightful and I learned a great deal from our conversations. I'm excited to have made some new friends!

The daily format of these workshops usually started out with various welcomes followed by a keynote and 5 25-minute breakouts on various topics. My topic was on planning for 1:1 success, and I'll talk about that more in a follow up post. This speed dating style of presenting was challenging, but it really helped me to gather my language on this topic. Afterwards, reflection time was given to participants and then lunch. After this break, we kicked things up a notch and offered 15 minute app sharing time. Each group of 5 or so educators moved from table to table to learn about our recommendations. I chose to focus on content creation apps, and again I'll provide more details on this in a follow up post. After this activity, another keynote followed and participants were given a short amount of time to present a rough plan for next steps. These plans were presented to the larger group, and everyone left with a sense of where they wanted to proceed. I really admired the schedule as it promoted colleagiality, discussion and movement. Instead of talking at people all day, we were truly engaged and better able to understand their concerns and needs. 

I visited some extraordinary schools for these workshops, Pathlight School and the School of Science and Technology, Singapore. I couldn't take pictures at Pathlight due to privacy concerns with its special needs population, but I did take a few of SST and other places visited. More importantly, I met many extraordinary educators and it seems like counterparts in this part of the world are very thoughtful and knowledgable about best practices in education. This was particularly evident in their final presentations to the group at large. While I haven't had the opportunity to work with a majority of Singaporean and international educators, it seems like they are all on the same page with a committment to teaching inquiry as foundation to learning subject matter. Interational educators largely subscribe to the thematic International Baccaleareate curriculum and the Singaporean educators seemed better versed in various approaches to learning and will travel to learn more about best practices. For instance, one vice principal mentioned that his colleagues recently traveled to Chicago to attend a Lesson  Study conference. If you're not familiar with this Japanese approach to teaching, check out this Wikipedia entry.

Interestingly, I had many conversations with educators over the course of the week of the competitiveness involved with Singaporean schools (and a bit around the international school world as well). The national exams are paramount in Singapore and basically determines the future paths of students. Students, parents and schools all feel the pressure, and each group thinks the pressure comes from each other. The parents think the schools are pressuring them and many turn to outside tutoring agencies and after school programs for extra support. The schools believe that pressure comes from the parents as well.

In order to understand all of this in its proper context, I think it's important to read material on the Ministry of Education's web site that explains its vision. Yes, standardized testing is incredibly important in this society, but they support and invest in their schools and teachers in order to provide their students with the best possible teaching force. Everyone understands that human capital is their only and best resource and they seem united in their quest for excellence. Would this approach work in the U.S? I honestly don't know, but I think our own national agenda is not shared by all constituencies, is fairly negative in its approach to attempting to get results, and does not do enough to support teachers and to build effective and engaging learning environments.

On the topic of learning environments, make sure to take a look at my photos of SST. I wish I had photos to show you of Pathlight, but I'll attempt to tell you what I saw. This school had a traditional Singaporean school footprint... sort of shaped like the letter E, with various cooridors branching out from. There was air conditioning in the rooms where we worked, but generally, Singaporean schools do not necessarily rely on A/C. Lots of fans and ventilated windows and doors seem to be the norm. Pathlights had student art work exhibited and even sold some pieces,  and generally provided support for their students in the form of extra signage (whiteboards by the bus loading area indicated who was to take the bus that day and who wasn't). Their library looked inviting, and they even had a room set aside as a design studio.

The School of Science and Technology was even more amazing as it is a recently completed campus costing around $49 million dollars (Singaporean dollars). It is the most state of the art STEM school I've had the opportunity to visit, and it provided incredible work spaces for both students and faculty. Teachers had individual cubicles in a large office area that was adjoined by an open faculty lounge with several meeting spaces. Rooms for every purpose you can imagine were present including professional development spaces with flexible walls,  science labs equipped with high end equipment, a huge theatre, and a studio for film production activities. The overall look was very modern with bright, bold colors, inspiring phrases were painted on walls, and modular configurable lockers in the halls. One detail that I especially appreciated was the long unobtrusive power strips embedded in lab tables where multiple students could share power.  Most importantly, this school had a vision clearly understood by its principal. Over the course of his tour of the building, it was evident that he understood what it took to provide a 21st century (and beyond) education to his students. In hindsight, I'd like to know more about what Singapore does to cultivate its leaders because this gentleman certainly got it, and I believe that we should be focusing more on leadership in the U.S. 

On Friday, I capped off my week spending time at Chatsworth International, a for-profit international school led by a team that includes ADEs Tyler Sherwood, Mark McCallum and Rob Newberry. They have a common set of a values and are incredibly colleagial. While at Chatworth, I worked with the English department, discussing topics for infusing technology into their curriculum. These teachers asked great questions, shared their own knowledge and were able to experiment with various tools as I led the way. I think they were probably overwhelmed to a certain degree by the possibilities, but hopefully, our session will inspire them to explore ideas and tools of interest as they will soon be on summer break. The kids at Chatsworth were lovely, too, asking me interesting questions when introduced and I'm glad I got to see where kids were present... most of the Singaporean students were on holiday from their schools as was the case when I visited in November 2008. 

Friday night included dinner with the Chatsworth leadership team and I plied them with questions about international school life. It intrigues me, and perhaps one day, I'll take the plunge. They definitely have a unique culture and set of challenges, quite different from US public and private schools. Generally, I think there's more accountability involved (sometimes applied fairly and not so fairly) as many of these schools are for profit and they have an excellent and large pool of teachers from which to hire. There is an intentional revolving door of students and teachers as both educators and families in these schools tend to move fairly quickly for a variety of reasons. I'm also very interested in learning more about the International Baccalaureate curriculum, and would love to get trained in this one day as I think it would benefit my work. 

Thanks for reading my ramblings thus far. My intention was just to get a few of my thoughts  down abou this trip before the whirlwind of the June conference season fully takes effect. Many, many thanks to everyone who helped with my trip and with whom I interacted. I'm so grateful for this opportunity and I look forward to continuing conversations over social media, etc! 

 


My 2012 Singapore Report

I've hugged my family,  unpacked my bags, given my kids gifts (which included a Singaporean version of Monopoly),  run a few loads of laundry and am now settled in to write a bit about my trip during this past week to Singapore. Thanks to my friend, fellow Apple Distinguished Educator colleague, and now Apple employee,  Pav,  I was first invited to work with a new class of Apple Distinguished Educators for the Asia region back in 2008. That was a life changing trip in itself..... I had the opportunity to visit several Singaporean schools, including the School of the Arts and Singapore Sports School, and also to work with amazing Singaporean and international school educators for a week during the 2008 Asia Apple Distinguished Educator Institute.  A year later, educators and students from Maris Stella High School in Singapore came to Chicago over the course of two visits  to the U.S,  intent on forming  foundations for global collaborations. I was priviledged to spend time with Maris Stella teams on both visits.

Consequently, I've thought a great deal about Asia, and specifically Singapore, and was really pleased to be invited to return again this spring. On this visit, the city/country itself seemed to not have changed much, although it did seem like it was more populous. There were still many buildings under construction as evidenced by a plethora of construction cranes, established buildings and streets were in pristine condition, and the weather was still hot, and perhaps a bit more humid. Two huge Singaporean projects were finished since my last visit.... the Universal Studios theme park on Sentosa Island where I stayed last time, and the amazing Marina Bay Sands casino complex with a ship-like structure and pool on its roof. I stayed near Orchard Road, a main high-end shopping district, and again, was amazed by the mass amount of attention devoted to brands and shopping. Marina Bay Sands also sported a very high end mall which was astounding huge. To me, the focus on consumerism was a bit overwhelming, but also a sign of a vibrant economy. We also drove by Singapore's port which reportedly is the largest in the world and never closes. Not much is made in Singapore and it is a gateway to the rest of Asia. Human capital is its best resource and this is evident in the careful planning that pervades this society.

As an aside, I think Singapore would make an excellent topic of study in a interdisciplinary global studies program in middle or high school. Studying its very intentional government would lead to fascinating debates regarding how much control governments should or should not have. Singapore is also a go to country for many financial institutions, so studying its economic forces and impact on the world's economy would also be of interest. And, examining its highly competitive educational system would also lends itself to thinking deeply about the purpose of education. 

Continuing on with details on my visit, I spent four days holding workshops for Asian educators, mostly focused on the iPad. For the first two days, there was an emphasis on accessibility and our third day focused more on general use of Apple technologies. The format of the workshops really worked well and kept participants busy and engaged. Pav served as an emcee extraordinaire and kept the mood light. He's really come into his own working for Apple, and I was so impressed with his leadership and knowledge. Working with me on various days were several ADEs including Jane Ross, Jane Harris, Dawn Hallett, Tyler Sherwood, and Rob Newberry and Greg O'Connor of Australia's Spectronics which runs this conference on inclusive learning technologies. This team was absolutely delightful and I learned a great deal from our conversations. I'm excited to have made some new friends!

The daily format of these workshops usually started out with various welcomes followed by a keynote and 5 25-minute breakouts on various topics. My topic was on planning for 1:1 success, and I'll talk about that more in a follow up post. This speed dating style of presenting was challenging, but it really helped me to gather my language on this topic. Afterwards, reflection time was given to participants and then lunch. After this break, we kicked things up a notch and offered 15 minute app sharing time. Each group of 5 or so educators moved from table to table to learn about our recommendations. I chose to focus on content creation apps, and again I'll provide more details on this in a follow up post. After this activity, another keynote followed and participants were given a short amount of time to present a rough plan for next steps. These plans were presented to the larger group, and everyone left with a sense of where they wanted to proceed. I really admired the schedule as it promoted colleagiality, discussion and movement. Instead of talking at people all day, we were truly engaged and better able to understand their concerns and needs. 

I visited some extraordinary schools for these workshops, Pathlight School and the School of Science and Technology, Singapore. I couldn't take pictures at Pathlight due to privacy concerns with its special needs population, but I did take a few of SST and other places visited. More importantly, I met many extraordinary educators and it seems like counterparts in this part of the world are very thoughtful and knowledgable about best practices in education. This was particularly evident in their final presentations to the group at large. While I haven't had the opportunity to work with a majority of Singaporean and international educators, it seems like they are all on the same page with a committment to teaching inquiry as foundation to learning subject matter. Interational educators largely subscribe to the thematic International Baccaleareate curriculum and the Singaporean educators seemed better versed in various approaches to learning and will travel to learn more about best practices. For instance, one vice principal mentioned that his colleagues recently traveled to Chicago to attend a Lesson  Study conference. If you're not familiar with this Japanese approach to teaching, check out this Wikipedia entry.

Interestingly, I had many conversations with educators over the course of the week of the competitiveness involved with Singaporean schools (and a bit around the international school world as well). The national exams are paramount in Singapore and basically determines the future paths of students. Students, parents and schools all feel the pressure, and each group thinks the pressure comes from each other. The parents think the schools are pressuring them and many turn to outside tutoring agencies and after school programs for extra support. The schools believe that pressure comes from the parents as well.

In order to understand all of this in its proper context, I think it's important to read material on the Ministry of Education's web site that explains its vision. Yes, standardized testing is incredibly important in this society, but they support and invest in their schools and teachers in order to provide their students with the best possible teaching force. Everyone understands that human capital is their only and best resource and they seem united in their quest for excellence. Would this approach work in the U.S? I honestly don't know, but I think our own national agenda is not shared by all constituencies, is fairly negative in its approach to attempting to get results,  and does not do enough to support teachers and build effective and engaging learning environments.

On the topic of learning environments, make sure to take a look at my photos of SST. I wish I had photos to show you of Pathlights, but I'll attempt to tell you what I saw. This school had a traditional Singaporean school footprint... sort of shaped like the letter E, with various cooridors branching out from. There was air conditioning in the rooms where we worked, but generally, Singaporean schools do not necessarily rely on A/C. Lots of fans and ventilated windows and doors seem to be the norm. Pathlights had student art work exhibited and even sold some pieces,  and generally provided support for their students in the form of extra signage (whiteboards by the bus loading area indicated who was to take the bus that day and who wasn't). Their library looked inviting, and they even had a room set aside as a design studio.

The School of Science and Technology was even more amazing as it is a recently completed campus costing around $49 million dollars (Singaporean dollars). It is the most state of the art STEM school I've had the opportunity to visit, and it provided incredible work spaces for both students and faculty. Teachers had individual cubicles in a large office area that was adjoined by an open faculty lounge with several meeting spaces. Rooms for every purpose you can imagine were present including professional development spaces with flexible walls,  science labs equipped with high end equipment, a huge theatre, and a studio for film production activities. The overall look was very modern with bright, bold colors, inspiring phrases were painted on walls, and modular configurable lockers in the halls. One detail that I especially appreciated were the long unobtrusive power strips embedded in lab tables where multiple students could share power.  Most importantly, this school had a vision clearly understood by its principal. Over the course of his tour of the building, it was clear that he understood what it took to provide a 21st century (and beyond) education to his students. In hindsight, I'd like to know more about what Singapore does to cultivate its leaders because this gentleman certainly got it, and I believe that we should be focusing more on leadership in the U.S. 

On Friday, I capped off my week spending time at Chatworth International, a for-profit international school led by a team that includes Tyler Sherwood, Mark McCallum and Rob Newberry. They have a common set of a values and are incredibly colleagial. While at Chatworth, I worked with the English department, discussing topics for infusing technology into their curriculum. These teachers asked great questions, shared their own knowledge and were able to experiment with various tools as I led the way. I think they were probably overwhelmed to a certain degree by the possibilities, but hopefully, our session will inspire them to explore ideas and tools of interest as they will soon be on summer break. The kids at Chatsworth were lovely, too, asking me interesting questions when introduced and I'm glad I got to see where kids were present... most of the Singaporean students were on holiday from their schools as was the case when I visited in November 2008. 

Friday night included dinner with the Chatworth leadership team and I plied them with questions about international school life. It intrigues me, and perhaps one day, I'll take the plunge. They definitely have a unique culture and set of challenges, quite different from US public and private schools. Generally, I think there's more accountability involved (sometimes applied fairly and not so fairly) as many of these schools are for profit and they have an excellent and large pool of teachers from which to hire. There is an intentional revolving door of students and teachers as both educators and families in these schools tend to move fairly quickly for a variety of reasons. I'm also very interested in learning more about the International Baccalaureate curriculum, and would love to get trained in this one day as I think it would benefit my work. 

Thanks for reading my ramblings thus far. My intention was just to get a few of my thoughts  down abou this trip before the whirlwind of the June conference season fully takes effect. Many, many thanks to everyone who helped with my trip and with whom I interacted. I'm so grateful for this opportunity and I look forward to continuing conversations over social media, etc! 

 


Going Global at Follett's New Leaf in Learning Conference #NLIL12

Materials for today's conference include a copy of my slides that can be accessed via Slideshare or the actual files can be downloaded from Box.net. Also, additional materials that I've compiled for a workshop in case attendees would like to take a deeper dive.

Enjoy and I hope you all will join us over at the Global Education Collaborative and Conference!


The 2011 Global Education Conference is Coming.....

GEC-badge-notextSteve Hargadon and I are ramping up for the second annual Global Education Conference, scheduled for November 14th through November 18th, 2011. Sessions will be held around the clock to accommodate time zones, and the best part is that the entire event is free!

In other conference news, our first set of keynote speakers has been announced. Keynotes will include Chris Dede and Howard Gardner of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Alan November of November Learning, Ewan McIntosh of NoTosh Limited, and Ed Gragert of iEARN-USA.  We are thrilled that these distinguished speakers will share their expertise with us. More keynotes will be announced in the next week or so, so please stay tuned!

Additionally, we have a new mission statement that I think will clarify the purpose of this event. Thanks to the GEC Advisory Board Leadership Team for collaborating on this!

The Global Education Conference is a collaborative, world-wide community initiative involving students, educators, and organizations at all levels. It is designed to significantly increase opportunities for building education-related connections around the globe while supporting cultural awareness and recognition of diversity. 
The conference seeks to present ideas, examples, and projects related to connecting educators and classrooms with a strong emphasis on promoting global awareness, fostering global competency, and inspiring action towards solving real–world problems. Through this event, it is our hope that attendees will challenge themselves and others to become more active citizens of the world. Let us learn, question, create, and engage in meaningful, authentic opportunities within a global context! 

Here's what you need to know right now regarding conference housekeeping items: 

  • The Call for Proposals is still open through October 31. Please follow the outlined directions.
  • If you have submitted a proposal, make sure you join the presenters group in the GEC community. This is very important if you want to receive updates. 
  • Session acceptances will be rolled out starting October 25. We will start chronologically with the first submissions. 
  • The conference schedule will not be posted until acceptances go out. Speakers will then have the opportunity to self-schedule their presentations. 
  • This is not an ICT conference nor a general education conference. Make sure your proposals are tied to our mission.
  • The GEC leadership team will be going through proposals and leaving suggestions for improving your proposals. Please follow through on these comments or contact us if you have questions. 
  • Volunteers are needed to moderate sessions, so please join the volunteer group if you are interested in helping. Training will be provided if you're not familiar with the Blackboard Collaborate platform.
  • Our partnership list is growing. If you are a non-profit, fill out the form to partner at no cost with us. If you're a commercial entity, email hargadon@gmail.com for information about how you can be involved. 
  • Badges are now available for download. Add our icon to your Twitter or Facebook profile; post a badge to your blog or web site if you are a volunteer, presenter or advisory board member. 
  • We need help with outreach. Please use this press release (http://goo.gl/uIg5r) and poster (http://goo.gl/7Gf1w) to let others know about the event. 
  • We particularly want to reach student groups and ministries of education. Increased student participation is sought, and we hope that ministries of education will have the capacity to inform a great number of educators about this conference opportunity. 
  • Our celebration coordinator, Pheo Martin, is looking to create slideshows of conference presenters and attendees. Read her post for more details. 

Finally, a big shout out and thank you to EdSurge for mentioning our event repeatedly in their happening newsletter. If you haven't checked out this site dedicated to educational innovation, take a look. 

That's all the news that fit to blast out to you right now... please let us know if you have any questions or concerns either through email or through a discussion post in the community.

Thanks for your continued help and support,

Lucy Gray

elemenous@gmail.com

Co-Chair

The 2011 Global Education Conference

 

Steve Hargadon

hargadon@gmail.com

Co-Chair

The 2011 Global Education Conference

 


ACTEM Workshops

Very excited to be in Maine today, home of the famed Maine Laptop Initiative.  Every educator at this conference will most likely have some sort of device as this state has been pioneering 1 to 1 computing and I'm excited to see how this has amplified technology fluency with educators.

My workshops today are two standard ones that I've been teaching and tweaking this year. I've completely re-tooled them for this event:

Exploring Instructional Uses of YouTube

Going Global: Preparing Students to be Citizens of the World

Let me know what you think and feel free to use any of these resources!


Going Global with Apple in the Classroom

I had a ball last night presenting at the Upper Westside Apple Store in Manhattan. It was a bit surreal to walk in the store and see my Bill Frakes photo on a poster (my friends who accompanied me actually tried to see if they'd give me the poster afterwards, but no dice). My focus was on global collaboration and the role of Apple tools in creating your global collaboration toolkit. More will be coming on this topic as I'm part of an ADE group working on an exhibit for iTunes U!

I anticipated the best part of the evening to be demo'ing Facetime and iChat with ADE colleagues around the world. There were concerns about doing these activities over the very busy Apple Store network, so we nixed this plan. However, the work of my colleagues is evident in the presentation; make sure to click on their photos in order to visit their web sites. 

The best part of presenting at the store was the ensuing conversations with audience members who came up to chat afterwards. I met someone who works with accessibility at Apple, a former UN employee who runs a global education foundation, and a slew of other interesting folks. I hope they will keep in touch to continue the global education dialogue. 

Click on underlined text and photos for hyperlinks to additional content. 

 

Going Global with Apple in the Classroom
View more presentations from Lucy Gray
Download PDF and Keynote slides here:

 


Professional Development School Institute at Minnesota State

Today I'm in Mankato, Minnesota as part of a leadership institute for selected school leaders. I'm learning so much already from Sam Steiger, head of MNS's adventure education program which is one of the three university units that helps coordinate and facilitate this program.  Adventure education elemenents are built in to this leadership experience and educators within this institute will be participating in outdoor ed short courses later this summer.  Also, as an aside, experiential education is big here and people come for their Master's degree program within the College of Education's Ed Leadership department.

Each participant gets a journal designed by the program facilitators and published in Blurb. It's a small volume that could fit in a purse or back pocket and has template pages to lead institute participants through reflecting on their activities within the program. I especially like how there are inspirational quotes scattered throughout. What a great, thoughtful and creative gift to teachers. I'd rather have a book like this any day than a stack of handouts at a PD session.

Also, worth checking out are the books Zoom and Re-Zoom by Istvan BanyaiSam also just led a great community building activity using a book called Re-Zoom . I think this a great metaphor for leading in a school. How do you go from the macro to the micro and still have everyone on board and working together?

My main point of posting today was to publish my materials for this afternoon, but I excited about what I'm learning just being an observer and had to share.

Below is my stuff.....I've added some new stuff to my going global presentation, by the way. We'll be on Skype this afternoon at about 2 PM (14:00 GMT)  if anyone want to share their global education projects with us. My skype name is elemenous.

Minnesota State - Going Global: Preparing Students for Global Citizenship


Paper.li: GlobalEd Collaborative News

I've been experimenting with Paper.li, a free service that aggregates links shared via Facebook and Twitter and publishes it in a newspaper-like format. With Twitter, you can have this online newspaper created by using your Twitter feed, the feed from a hashtag, or from a list you've created in Twitter. I've found that the list feed seems to generate the best results for me personally... I tried one with a hashtag that no one really uses extensively yet so there wasn't enough material available to generate a newspaper on a regular basis. Using my own Twitter feed seems a little self-promoting and wildly varied as I follow 7000+ people. My global list consists of 160+ Twitterstreams of high quality sources, and thus this particular Paper.li newspaper tends to be a decent read each day.

Here's a sample:

 


Presentations from #D219Tech

Below are my slidedecks from District 219's (Niles North and Niles West High Schools in Skokie, IL) technology conference. These topics have been a staple of my repertoire lately, but every time I present, I tweak the slides just a bit. Most of the things I mention are hyperlinked and will lead you directly to the resources. For instance, in the Google preso, the bullets are linked, but I didn't underline them all for esthetic purposes.

Thanks to Guy Ballard and team for a wonderful day. Great to catch up with fellow Illinois educators and to catch David Warlick's fabulous keynote. He paints a picture of current shifts in learning and as always, I'm impressed with his talent for telling the compelling story. I wish every educator and parent in the country had the opportunity to hear him, so that perhaps we all would be more on the same page.

To those who attended my sessions, thanks for your comments and input. Please stay in touch and join the Global Education Collaborative!


TEDxNYED - Connect Now!

Here are my slides from today's presentation... I've included the notes, which served as a guide for my talk. I didn't read them verbatim or memorize them, and the notes may help to explain my talk a bit better. Also, I neglected to go into detail about one part of presentation. I had planned to describe some of the neat #globaled10 presentations that are now archived on the conference web site, and I completely skipped over this. If you are interested in diving into some recorded sessions of the Global Education Conference, make sure you take a look at some of the screenshots I provided as potential starting points.

Thank you, TEDxNYED organizers and attendees... can't wait to review other sessions and reflect on this day!

TEDxNYED - Connect Now
View more presentations from Lucy Gray

TEDxNYED - Connect Now


Participate Virtually in My Global Collaboration Workshop!

I'll be facilitating a workshop at the Instructional Technology Strategies Conference in Portland, Oregon on February 21 from 8 AM - 11:30 AM PST.

During this session, participants will be exploring a variety of tools as they think about connecting their classrooms to the world. You can participate, too, in a number of ways. The information in this survey will be shared with workshop participants, but will not be open to all to see. If you want to see the resulting spreadsheet, just let me know and I'll add you to the document. Please consider joining us as I think this will be a fun way to make some new PLN connections!

Here's how to get involved:

1. Sign up to Skype with participants for a few minutes during the workshop. This is an informal opportunity to introduce yourself to another educator and relate how you use Skype professionally.

AND/OR

2. Join our group in the Global Education Collaborative to answer questions asynchronously if participants have questions. (http://globaleducation.ning.com/group/itscconferenceworkshop)

AND/OR

3. Sign up to mentor a conference participant or to work on a specific project.

SIGN UP HERE IF YOU'D LIKE TO HELP: http://tinyurl.com/ITSCmentors

Let me know if you have any questions!

Thanks,

Lucy Gray
elemenous@gmail.com


Mission Accomplished!

On behalf of my Global Education Conference co-chair, Steve Hargadon of Classroom 2.0, and myself, I want to extend our deep felt thanks to all who participated in last week's online conference. We are particularly grateful for our amazing volunteers, partner organizations, and presenters who gave shared their expertise during the course of the week. Professional generosity really made this unique conference happen!

This free event took place entirely online using the videoconferencing tool, Elluminate. Everything went relatively smoothly with 15,028 unique logins, 8,372 hours of presentations attended, and 32,681 web site visits just this week.  Sessions were recorded and can be viewed at your leisure on the conference web site. 

We are really pleased with the success of our inaugural event and are thinking of how we can best carry the spirit of the conference forward.  Join the official social network of the conference to stay in contact and keep developing the feeling of community that many of us experienced, particularly during the closing session. Please continue to use the Global Education Collaborative to share your work, to point out great resources, and to nurture global friendships! 

If you were able to attend any live sessions, we'd love your feedback, so please take time to reply to this post in the GEC. Leave comments or post a link to your blog if you've already reflected on what you've learned. Please also visit the conference wiki, and consider joining this space to add to our growing collection of global education materials.


Stay tuned for more developments! The conference is only the beginning!


Conference Quick Links

Wiki - search for resources or add your own

http://www.globaleducationwiki.com/

Mentor Program - become a mentor or find partners for collaborative projects

http://www.globaleducationconference.com/mentor-program.html

Social Network - keep the conversations going

http://globaleducation.ning.com

Facebook - become a fan

http://www.facebook.com/#%21/pages/Global-Education-Conference/125602090788788

Flickr - share photos; participate in simple collaborative conference activities

http://www.flickr.com/groups/globaledcon/

Slideshare - presenters, post your slides here

http://www.slideshare.net/event/the-global-education-conference

Twitter - follow conference announcements

http://twitter.com/#%21/globaledcon

Twitter Search - check out what others are saying about the conference

http://twitter.com/#%21/search/globaledcon

Map - add your location to this Google Map

http://tinyurl.com/globaledconmap

Networking Directory -find and quickly connect to other conference attendees

http://tinyurl.com/gecdirectory

 


Cross-Posted at the O'Reilly Radar Blog: Education's Real Superheroes Assemble

Cross-posted on O'Reilly Radar

On Monday, November 15, 2010, Steve Hargadon and I are bringing together real superheroes. We've joined forces via our respective education social networks, Classroom 2.0 and the Global Education Collaborative, to showcase best practices in global education using the videoconferencing platform, Elluminate. With more than 350 general sessions and 60 keynote sessions, our colleagues in our personal learning networks will ponder the future of education globally in this completely free and virtual conference.

We've chosen to organize an event that we believe will re-inspire educators in this age of school reform. Never before has it been easier to connect classrooms around the world using technology, and we believe that the cornerstone of our success as a global community lies in students and teachers learning how to connect, communicate and collaborate. The next generation faces increasingly complex problems with world-wide implications, and in order to tackle these challenges, students today must learn to work effectively in our knowledge-based, global economy. These are not simply concerns for education in the United States, but global issues that require open and collaborative engagement that reaches beyond borders.

But what is global education exactly? The term seems to have varying connotations for people. For some, global education relates to the United Nations Millennium Development Goal of universal primary education for the world's children. To others, it might mean educating about global social justice issues such as human trafficking and disease prevention. In schools, global education generally has been addressed by providing multicultural experiences to students so that they develop a better understanding of geography and cultures.

The other day I came across some well articulated thoughts on the subject that broaden traditional interpretations of global education. In 2004, Fairleigh Dickinson University President J. Michael Adams reflected on his attempt to define global education in his inaugural address:

Global education can be summarized by connections and perspectives. It's about understanding the nature of the connections that link people from all corners of the globe, and it's about expanding those connections for the betterment of all. It means considering the world as a whole, with a rich (and sometimes unpleasant) interplay of nations and cultures. And it's about introducing ourselves and our students to multiple viewpoints, so we might develop the ability to understand the world through the eyes of others and to work alongside others from different backgrounds.

During the 2010 Global Education Conference, we'll be encouraging our colleagues to ponder their own definitions of global education and to think about how to practically weave global awareness into their teaching as recommended by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills' Framework for 21st Learning. According to the Partnership, academic content is still important in today's classrooms, but teachers need to artfully integrate content with 21st-century themes of global awareness, civic literacy, environmental literacy, health literacy, and financial literacy.

Thought leaders from innovative education-related organizations such as iEARN, ePals, and the Asia Society Partnership for Global Learning will be joining us to generously share their work, in addition to more than 300 classroom practitioners and students. This conference offers something for everyone, and it is our hope that participants will be empowered by discovering and exploring a multitude of resources. Technology makes this global online gathering possible, and it's time to start leveraging its power to improve education.

For more information and the full schedule of sessions and keynotes, visit globaleducationconference.com


Guide for the 2010 Global Education Conference

The big event is drawing near... today's the last day to get in your presentation proposals and the conference starts November 15, 2010. Visit http://globaeducationconference.com for further details. 

Here's a document I've put together so that people can follow conference happenings. Please pass it along to your colleagues  we hope to see online during the week of November 15 - 19!

 

Global Ed Con Cheat Sheet


Using Flickr for Community Building at the Global Education Conference


Lucy Gray, originally uploaded by elemenous.

The Global Education Conference Flickr Group

In order to show people how social media can be used to facilitate collaboration, I thought I'd develop a few activities in Flickr to take place in conjunction with the Global Education Conference. This event will take place entirely online using the video conferencing platform called Elluminate during the week of November 15-19. For further details, visit globaleducationconference.com. Also, consider joining our social network at http//globaleducation.ning.com.

I am going to post an activity for each day of the conference, but feel free to jump and post photos to these activities at any time. Also, feel free to list your own idea for an activity in the Flickr group's discussion area. Let's see how we can use this group to get to know each other and to explore the features of Flickr!

Let me know if you have any questions!


Last Call for Global Education Conference Proposals

Steve Hargadon of Classroom 2.0 and I are co-chairs of a free, online conference scheduled to take place during the week of November 15-19.  The focus is on global collaboration and bringing interested parties together to explore best practices in helping students and educators develop global competencies. General sessions are starting to be posted at http://globaleducationconference.com and we have over 50 partners including NAIS, the Joan Ganz Cooney Center, the Asia Society, ePals, iEARN, CoSN and the Discovery Educator network.

This is a last call for presentation proposals and I hope you'll mark your calendars for what promises to be a unique professional development event. Proposals are due by November 1.

Here are some helpful links if you'd like to get involved:

To sign up for our mailing list, click here: http://tinyurl.com/globaledconmainlist
To submit a proposal, click here: http://tinyurl.com/globaledconproposals
To network with other conference participants, click here: http://tinyurl.com/globaledconnetworkingform
To see the networking directory click here: http://tinyurl.com/globaledconnetworking
To sign up for our online community, click here: http://globaleducation.ning.com/
To view our collection of resources: http://www.globaleducationwiki.com/
Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/globaledcon

Hope to see you online in November, and please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks,

Lucy Gray
Conference Co-Chair
Founder, the Global Education Collaborative

 


Presentations for #CECA2010: Connecticut Educators Computer Association Conference


Live Blogging from the Education Project

Live blogging for #tep10 will appear here staring in about 6 hours. Send me an email at elemenous at gmail.com or a DM via Twitter (@elemenous) if you'd like to participate. Joining me will be Kevin Brookhouser and Julene Reed! 

 

 


The Ning Debacle: It's Not About the Money (entirely)

Today, I sent out a blast in the Global Education Collaborative about the changes to Ning's pricing. Read more about it here, but the social network creation company is experiencing financial difficulties which have led to layoffs and the discontinuation of all previously free networks created on its platform. A plan is supposed to emerge within 2 weeks, and new APIs and features are expected within 90 days. Not soon enough, I say.

I started the Global Education Collaborative using the Ning platform in 2007 after being inspired by the success of Steve Hargadon's Classroom 2.0 Ning. My site has grown slowly, but steadily, and our membership hovers around 3500 members. Steve's Ning has an astounding 40,000 educators interested utilizing new and emerging technologies within his online community. Ning has changed the way I connect to other teachers, probably almost as much as Twitter. 

This afternoon as the news got out, it was fascinating to see people's reactions over Twitter. I followed a search in Twitter (#ning) and read everything from people truly shocked to others who thought it was high time people were expected to pay to others offering jobs to the laid off Ning workers. This is another example of how news can unfold via Twitter.

My first reaction was to panic and to chide myself for relying too heavily on a tool that inevitably was going to evaporate in some form. I thought about our members and how we would lose many if we moved to another platform; I thought about the all the content accrued in the GEC, too. I also thought about the current fee to have ads removed which is $19.95 per month. A friend emailed me to basically state that it's only fair to pay for services that are of high quality. I agree, but I believe that's from a business perspective, not an education perspective.

Here's essentially what I wrote in response with some edits: 

Educators pay out of pocket for many items that they are never reimbursed for, and generally, they are paid much less than other professionals. Educators pour tons of manpower hours into cultivating these networks as well. There are also many non-profits who are looking for affordable, preferably free, methods of connecting with their communities. The word of mouth support for Ning from these groups is huge, and should be valued by Ning.

Wikispaces has long had a policy of making ad-free wikis available to educators because they know the intangible value of having teachers use their product. They know that educators will spread the good word and will provide feedback to them about Wikispaces. I'm wondering if Ning has ever valued educators; many of us thought this when Steve Hargadon was let go as their education evangelist last year.

The most troubling part of Ning's announcement to me was that it was announced with no plan in place. People would not be freaking out if a transition plan had been made publicly available immediately. It should have been publicized in tandem with the announcement. I think teachers would pay if such a plan existed; we are not about free loading and know that if something is of quality, it's worth a reasonable price. 

One GEC member responded to my announcement in the Global Education Collaborative that several charities in Africa that he worked with had Nings and he would no longer continue with the company if they started to charge. Just think of all the good work that is going on around the world (where people AREN'T getting paid for their efforts) that may stop as a result of this decision. 

The bottom line is, however, that we'll just have to wait until see what plans unfold. I hope Ning is listening carefully to its user base. If you are interested in sharing stories and thoughts about this, please take my survey and you can also see the results here


Going Global By Walking the Talk

About a year ago, I had the opportunity to visit Singapore...thank you Apple, Pav and Adrian! It was an amazing, life expanding experience. For two weeks, I visited 6 schools and worked with a fabulous group of Apple Distinguished Educators. I can't believe how the year has flown since then and a day doesn't go by without me contemplating this adventure.

You never know when contacts made somewhere will come in handy. Approximately a month ago I was contacted to help plan a trip being organized by Maris Stella High School, one of the schools I visited in 2008. Educators from this school wanted to travel here to establish partnerships for global projects. These projects would start in pilot format in January 2010 ideally, followed by a visit from their principal in February or March. In July or August, there would be some sort of culminating student conference, possibly with US students visiting the Singaporean students. The projects would continue on with additional schools once this pilot was completed.  

After much discussion over iChat and email, the Maris Stella team decided to focus on high school grade levels, so I suggested that they visit Glenbrook North, where I know the tech coordinator, Ryan Bretag, and the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, where I used to teach. I also suggested that they continue on to Maine and connected them with Bette Manchester of the Maine International Center for Digital Learning. Bette set up visits for the Singaporeans at two Maine High Schools. Additionally, I suggested that this group visit the School at Columbia, which is comprised of grades K-8,  to learn more about their work with student social networks and Google Apps. As I write, they are in Maine and will be heading to New York shortly.

I had the opportunity to join my Singaporean friends on their trip to Glenbrook North, and it truly was a magical day. I can't wait to see the relationship between the two schools develop. Ryan Bretag and his group did an OUTSTANDING job of hosting this meeting, providing meals, tours, and access to Glenbrook students and staff. We also learned about their special Academy for International Studies.

Throughout the day, many opportunities for collaboration became apparent. For instance, one English class was incorporating new media literacies into the study of A Thousand Splendid Suns, a novel that takes place in Afghanistan. Students used a variety of media and a wiki to investigate different aspects of the book and according to Ryan Bretag, the framework for this was based on the work of Henry Jenkins. This model seemed replicable and appealed to many of the Maris Stella teachers. The Glenbrook North English teacher who designed this project as also very excited about possibly replicating the activities with a future class and the Singaporean team.

Yesterday, the group visited the Laboratory Schools and University of Chicago. I had another obligation during that time, so I met them at the Booth School of Business for lunch before they headed back towards O'Hare Airport to get ready for their next leg of their trip.

I continue to be impressed with the attitudes towards education expressed by Singaporeans in general. I observed last year that culturally, there is a strong priority on education. Singaporeans are comfortable seeking out best practices, and it is routine to travel abroad to learn from others or to bring experts to the country. They also understand that they must prepare their students to participate fully in the world at large; hence, the goal of global collaborations. Yes, they could find partners for global projects through a variety of organizations including the Global Education Collaborative, but this team in particular clearly understood that personal connections are vital to collaborative projects, that face to face meetings are still essential, despite technologies that allows us to interact easily with others around the world.

My final observation (at least for this blog post) is that my Singaporean guests were the most gracious, kind and interesting group. I really enjoyed talking shop with them and learning about their plans. I felt very comfortable with them and feel like I have 12 new friends to continue conversing with. Members of this team even brought trinkets for my children, which they were very excited about, and they also presented me with a lovely engraved plate. Lining the edges of this plate are various symbols of Singapore, and it is a great reminder of my trip last year to their country and of their visit to mine!

 



The Future of Education - Charting the Course of Teaching and Learning in a Networked World

The Future of Education - Charting the Course of Teaching and Learning in a Networked World.

Mark your calendars! On September 10, 2009, at 7 PM, Steve Hargadon and I will be moderating a virtual panel on global awareness. We have an all star line up (see below) and will be using Elluminate, a meeting tool that connects people globally. Our primary focus will be to highlight the work of many organizations including iEARNePals, and the Asia Society and to discuss the concept of global awareness in relation to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills' frame for 21st century learning. Post your questions and ideas here in the comments section or in the Future of Education community.

You will find access to the webinar by clicking HERE!

Panelists

Shari Albright

Bio: Shari Becker Albright serves as the Chief Executive Officer of the Asia Society International Studies Schools Network, a national network of small, internationally-themed secondary schools dedicated to preparing college ready, globally competent citizens for the 21st century.  Prior to joining the Asia Society, Shari served as the principal of a public, magnet school in the North East Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas – the International School of the Americas which was the recipient of the Goldman Sachs Prize in International Education.

URLs: http://www.asiasociety.org/education


Kim Cofino

Bio: Originally from the US, Kim has spent the last ten years teaching internationally, beginning in Munich, Germany, continuing in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and currently in Bangkok, Thailand. An Apple Distinguished Educator, Kim regularly consults with other international schools interested in implementing 21st century learning, has been profiled on a number of educational websites and journals, and has spoken at conferences and professional development sessions throughout Europe, Asia, and the United States. Her professional blog, Always Learning, is an invaluable resource for teachers seeking examples of authentic student engagement.

URLs: http://mscofino.edublogs.org


Westley Field

Bio: Westley is Managing Director of Skoolaborate, a global initiative, involving over 40 schools and community organisations, that uses a blended environment including online units and virtual worlds to produce engaging student learning experiences. In his day job, Westley is the  MLC online learning director leading a 1 to 1 program that is recognized by many as one the best examples of blended learning world wide. Westley presents around the world on topics such as Making 1 to 1 work, Heuristics of implementing elearning, Second Life in Education, Educational Technology, Connecting Students in a Web 2.0 world and Leading in a Flat World.

 

URLs: http://www.skoolaborate.com, http://www.westleyfield.com


Lucy Gray

Bio: Lucy is the founder of the Global Education Collaborative, an online community designed to connect educators and organizations while promoting global awareness. She is currently employed by the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Chicago as an education technology specialist. She is an Apple Distinguished Educator and Google Certified Teacher.


URLs: http://globaleducation.ning.com, http://lucygray.org


Carol Anne McGuire

Bio: Technology Integration Specialist, Apple Distinguished Educator, Discovery Star Educator, ISTE Teacher of the Year Carol Anne McGuire is an award-winning educator who began her career teaching blind and visually impaired students over 20 years ago.  She is the founder and “Lead Rocker” of an international project called “Rock Our World.”  ROW connects students on every continent to collaborate in music composition, filmmaking and meeting each other in live video conferences.  Carol Anne has worked with companies such as Apple, Discovery, Disney, American Film Institute, Google and Will Smith. 

 

Carol Anne Keynotes all over the world on topics such as Global Collaboration, Accessibility, Digital Storytelling, Podcasting, Technology in the Classroom and Movie Making for the Non-Techy Teacher! 


URLs:  www.rockourworld.org, http://rockourworld.ning.com, http://discoveryeducatorabroad.com/rockourworld 


Diane Midness

Bio: Diane Midness is Director for Professional Development for iEARN USA. She is a former high school Media Specialist and Coordinating Teacher for Technology Integration   and program coordinator for The University of North Carolina’s Center for International Understanding’s International School Partnerships through Technology.

URLs: http://us.iearn.org


Rita Oates

Bio: Rita is Vice President of Education Markets for ePals, a global collaborative community with more than 18 million users in 200 countries. Earlier in her career, she was director of ed tech in Miami-Dade Public Schools, the nation's fourth largest, serving students born in more than 120 countries. She won a FIPSE grant for ed tech professional development in the district. She has also been graduate program chair in Computer Education and Technology at Barry University, and earlier taught high school English and journalism in three schools in Kansas -- rural, urban and suburban. She was the Education Editor of the first online service in the U.S. with color and graphics, called VIEWTRON, in the 1980s. She has keynoted and given workshops at major ed tech conferences from coast to coast and has written ten books and more than 100 articles about ed tech and school reform. As a child, she lived in Costa Rica and attended a public girls' school in Spanish. Just before joining ePals, she helped create an ed tech plan for the public schools in the United Arab Emirates.

URLs: www.epals.com


Sharon Peters

Bio: Sharon Peters is the Director of Technology at Hebrew Academy in Montreal, Canada. She recently won ISTE's Online Learning Award for the Darfur Video Project. In 2008 and 2009, she led teams who facilitated ICT workshops with an NGO, Teachers Without Borders Canada, to educators in the townships of South Africa and rural Kenya. She has presented keynotes at conferences and workshops throughout North America about new media literacies and global collaborative projects. Her students have participated in several award-winning international web-based collaborative projects with classes around the world using technology to support the learning goals.

URLs: http://wearejustlearning.ca
http://twbcanada.ning.com/
http://take2videos.ning.com/


Julene Reed

Bio: Julene Reed is the Director of Academic Technology for St. George's Independent School in Memphis, TN. She is on the advisory boards of: Apple Distinguished Educators, Dr. Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots, Polar Bears International, and the Tennessee Distance Learning Association.


Julene keynotes and leads workshops on Global Education, "Going Green," Web 2.0 for Education, Podcasting, Technology Integration, Digital Storytelling, Laptop Learning, Videoconferencing, 21st Century Teaching & Learning, and much more.


URLs: http://edcommunity.apple.com/ali/story.php?itemID=16249


Michael Searson

Bio: Michael Searson is executive director of Kean University's School for Global Education & Innovation. He is chairperson of the Xi Hu Conference on 21st Century Learning, to be held in Hangzhou, China in November 2009. His work often connects local school districts with international partners. Searson is a vice president for the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education; a member of the Global Learn Asia Pacific Executive Committee; a member of the Apple Distinguished Educator Advisory Board; Curriki Hearst Faculty Fellow. Searson has authored or coauthored a number of grants focusing on the integration of technology into educational settings.



New Global Project: citiesaroundtheworld » home

Link: citiesaroundtheworld » home.

I've created a wiki in hopes of luring the teachers I work with into trying wikis. Here's the description of the project and if you'd like to take a peek or join, visit the above link and request an invitation.

"Many students around the world study geography and specifically, cities. In the United States, this commonly takes place in third grade. This project, however, is open to any school class that would like to participate.

The main purpose of this online space is to provide a place for students and teachers to store information and artifacts created during these city units of study. Because material related to several different cities will be published here, students will be able to compare and contrast their home cities with those of other kids. Teachers will benefit as well by establishing relationships with teachers around the world and by gleaning project ideas from these online colleagues. All people involved will also hone their technological and collaborative skills by working in this wiki environment.

There are no hard and fast rules for the Cities Around the World wiki. Teachers can select any activity in which to participate, and are encouraged to edit the wiki by adding their own ideas.

Right now, this is a private space. Feel free to refer other teachers and kids here. Eventually, our wiki may be open to the public, so please take precautions to insure your students' privacy. Do not use students' full names in this space.

Remember that Wikispaces will create accounts for students without using email addresses if you give them usernames and passwords. See this page for more information!!!"


Friday 5: Ning

Hey Everyone -

A year or two ago, during the early stages of my foray into Web 2.0 applications,  I was introduced to a web site that I really didn't quite get called Ning. My vague recollection of the original Ning was that one could create various items to share with others such as a list of books. I recall exploring it a bit, not finding it particularly user friendly or compelling, and setting it aside for other Web 2.0 tools.

Fellow ITM blogger Steve Hargadon revived my interest in Ning last spring. Using Ning, he created two online communities that I joined, and I found that this social networking tool had completely changed since my initial exploration. In a nutshell, anyone can create a customized space online, make it public or private, and invite others to participate via threaded discussions, the sharing of multimedia, and posting of blog entries. Ning communities can be further embellished with all sorts of web widgets that are available from third party developers as well.

I am fascinated by how quickly Steve's Classroom 2.0 Ning caught on. Since March 2007, nearly 3000 educators have joined this group which focuses on using Web 2.0 tools (Flickr, del.icio.us, Google Docs & Spreadsheets are examples of this). For some reason the format put forth by Ning seems conducive to participation by others. Several worthwhile communities have since developed and I thought I'd share them with you this week.

I think Ning is a powerful tool because it makes it easy for educators to take charge of their professional development by interacting virtually with other like-minded souls. For instance, I've had answers to questions within hours, been directed to great edtech resources, philosophized with online colleagues about the state of education, and even met many of my fellow "friends" on Ning in person at conferences. My personal network has grown substantially because of this.

Keep your eye on Ning as it is still being developed and additional features are frequently announced. Recently, Steve started another group that focuses just on the uses of Ning within education. Ning wasn't necessarily developed as an education tool, but it seems teachers have found their Ning experiences worthwhile and are eager to try it out in their classrooms. Something has to be done about advertising within Ning sites before I will try it out with younger students, but in the meantime, it's a great tool for working with adults or maybe even high schoolers.

I hope you'll check out the following Ning groups and consider joining one or two! Let me know if you know of any other good Nings!

Thanks,

Lucy Gray
elemenous@gmail.com

------

1) School 2.0
http://school20.ning.com/

This is one of Steve Hargadon's original Ning sites and it focuses on rethinking schools under 21st century terms.

2) Classroom 2.0
http://classroom20.ning.com/

Here's a very active group in which people explore the use of emerging technologies in education.

3) Ning in Education
http://education.ning.com/

4) Global Education Collaborative
http://globaleducation.ning.com

Yes, this is a shameless plug for a Ning that I started and have been nurturing. If you're interested in global education related topics, this is the Ning for you. Many educators from around the world have joined this adventure and are in need of global collaborative partners. If you are looking for resources, projects, and ideas, this is the place for you! We will be holding our first online meeting this Sunday evening CST. Email me if you're interested in participating.

5) Literacy Coaches
http://literacycoaches.ning.com/

Matthew Needleman's new literacy site is designed to support coaches in his district using the Open Court reading series, but it is open to everyone and growing! Literacy coaching is a fairly new concept to me and I'm interested in it as its practiced in my new set of schools.

6) Open Education
http://openlearn.ning.com/

Learn more about Open University's open source courses and materials here.

7) Library 2.0
http://library20.ning.com/

A plethora of librarians have gathered here to share ideas and resources.

8) Learning 2.0 Conference
http://learning2cn.ning.com/

This event is taking place right now in Shanghai. Isn't is amazing how we can now follow along and learn virtually? This is the Ning that interests me the most right now!


Global Education Collaborative Meeting #1

I'm playing around with this very cool video conferencing tool called FlashMeeting. It's sponsored by Open University, I think, which hosts all sorts of open source content and courses. FlashMeeting is used for research purposes, so you to submit an application to be able to book through them, and meetings are recorded. Anyway, I'm hosting my first FlashMeeting this Sunday evening (September 16th 8PM CST)to discuss global education efforts; please consider joining and sharing any ideas that you may have. The meeting will be available for viewing when we're finished, too.

If you need more info, please contact me or check out the Global Education Collaborative ning.


Blog Action Day 2007 : Remix This Idea

I found a link to this in the Google Earth Users Guide Project blog. The main site can be found here .  I  like this activist concept, and will be thinking about what I can blog about on October 15th.

In the meantime, what about an Education Blog Action Day? Wouldn't it be neat if edubloggers or any bloggers with an interest, for that matter, blogged on a particular topic in education on one day, tagged it with the same tags and made a statement to the world? What topics would be good for this? Hmmm....perhaps something related to  NCLB, School 2.0, early literacy, digital divide? What is a univeral issue for everyone with education?


Field Trips 2.0 Project

I am part of a group of teachers working on a project that we plan on submitting to the Apple Learning Interchange. Specifically, this project focuses on the idea of reinventing field trips as we traditionally know them. We'd like to show teachers how to plan effectively for mobile learning experiences, what great excursions look like, and help them kick field trips up a notch by taking advantage of collaborative opportunities, digital tools, and web-based resources.

Interested educators are welcome to join our project. There are a couple of ways you and/or your colleagues can help:

1) Add bookmarks to our resource collection in del.icio.us by tagging any great links with the tag: Fieldtrips2.0.

2) Let us link to your educational blogs, blog posts, and Google Earth files that deal with your own field trip experiences. We also would love links to geocaching projects. We will post your name and school along with any links you send.

3) Participate in a group audio and/or video. We want to record a conversation, preferably using iChat AV, between multiple educators on how to make a field trip work, particularly when using Apple stuff and other digital equipment.

Send any of us an email indicating strands of interest if you'd like to participate. Additional details will then follow.

Thanks in advance,

Lucy Gray - University of Chicago Charter School
Judy Beaver - Punahou School
Andrew Gardner - The School at Columbia
Julene Reed - St. George's Independent Schools
Mike Searson - Kean University


Friday 5: Getting Ready for NECC 2007

Hi All -

Sorry for the dearth of activity on this listserv, but it's been a busy few weeks. I'm heading across the Midway Plaisance to a new job at the University of Chicago Center for Urban School Improvement, and it's been a stressful time making the decision to leave my current school. I'll be the Lead Technology Coach for the Center, working two days a week at one of four charter schools which are operated under the umbrella of the University. The rest of my time will be devoted to designing and implementing a technology professional development plan for all four charters run by USI. I am going to miss Lab very much, but I'll stay connected as my children will still attend school there. I am really grateful for the opportunity to have taught at Lab. My students and colleagues have been amazing, and I am appreciative of all that I have learned.

Anyway, I'm in the midst of preparing for the National Educational Computing Conference, which starts a week from tomorrow in Atlanta, Georgia. I'll be running a workshop for Apple with Julene Reed of St. George's Schools in Memphis, Tennessee, as well as participating in two panel presentations. I should also be floating around the Apple booth at various times, so stop by and say hello if you are attending the conference.

If you are not able to attend NECC, check out the following resources for following the conference virtually. I'll be publishing the Friday 5 on a more regular basis once life slows down a bit!

Take care,

Lucy Gray

1) NECC 2007 Flickr Group

Check out this link in the next week or so to see images taken by conference attendees. Flickr groups also allow for discussions, so you might catch some comments as well.

2) HitchHikr: NECC 2007

David Warlick has set up a service for aggregating conference information. Visit this page, and you'll see everything related to NECC that's been tagged with the keywords necc, neccprep, and necc2007.

3) NECC Podcasts and Web Casts
http://center.uoregon.edu/ISTE/NECC2007/program/podcasting.php
http://center.uoregon.edu/ISTE/NECC2007/program/video_on_demand.php

Several sessions have been selected to be podcasted or webcasted. I'm not sure how quickly these files will be published, though. I'm guessing Apple will also publish podcasts in the Conference Connections section of the Apple Learning Interchange, too.

4) NECC Bloggers

Many people have signed up to have links to their blogs posted on the NECC web site. These people, myself included, will be posting thoughts and reactions to the conference.

5) Lucy's Global Stuff
I'll be conducting a workshop on collaborative tools used to foster global awareness. I've created several resources that we will demonstrate. Feel free to jump in and add content, or just follow our progress as we add information.

The Global Education Collaborative Ning Group

The Global Education Collaborative Discussion Group | Google Groups

Flickr: The Global Education Collaborative

The Global Education Collaborative Wiki